• Sri Lanka Exports Development Board (SLEDB) - Food, Feed & Beverages

    Food & Beverage: Beyond the Norm of Quality

  • Sri Lankan Food and Beverage Products

    • Food and Beverages
    • Food and Beverages
    • Food and Beverages
    • Food and Beverages
    • Food and Beverages
    • Food and Beverages

    Due to its distinct geographical location in the heart of the Indian Ocean, Sri Lanka has an enviable variety and bountiful supply of vegetables, fruits, and natural beverages. Therefore, the island nation has a thriving food and beverage industry that caters to both domestic and international demand. Furthermore, its blooming agro-industrial economy puts it on centre stage for a wide variety of foods and beverages of various explosive flavours and unique textures.

    Food

    The Sri Lankan food and beverage industry produce a whole range of food items. This includes coconut, fresh and processed vegetables, and fruits, biscuits, seafood, rice, cereals, confectionery, bakery products, spice-based products, and various pre-cooked and frozen foods. In addition, there are also bee honey, natural sweeteners (kitul, coconut, palmyra ), dairy products, fish and meat-based products, and food manufactured as animal food.

    As befits a tropical island, Sri Lanka also has an excellent supply of fish and seafood. The succulent white seerfish, tuna, and mullet, usually grilled and served with chips and salad, are widely available along the coast, while crab, lobster, and prawns (often jumbo prawns) are magnificent. Cuttlefish is very versatile and prepared in several ways.

    Heirloom (traditional) Rice

    A typical Sri Lankan meal would usually comprise a large portion of rice. Therefore, rice is a staple dish in Sri Lankan cuisine and a major source of carbohydrates. Since ancient times, Sri Lanka's economy has always been heavily dependent on agriculture, especially paddy cultivation. For centuries, heirloom rice varieties have been dominating the local diet. Heirloom rice refers to indigenous rice varieties that have been cultivated by traditional farmers for centuries. In the past, Sri Lanka has offered more than thousands of heirloom rice varieties with the help of enormous irrigation structures, reservoirs and interconnected canals.
    It is estimated that there had been close to 1500-2000 varieties of heirloom rice. However, at present, a large portion of these heirloom varieties have been widely replaced by New Improved Varieties (NIV) of rice which were introduced to Sri Lankan farmers around the 1960s because of the higher yield associated with them. Regardless, some of the most famous varieties include Dal wee, Maa wee, Suduru Samba, Heenati, Rath Suwandel, Pachchaperumal, Dahanala, Kuruluthuda, Suwandel, Sudu Heenati, Madathawalu and Ma wee. Many of these varieties are red rice varieties that offer an array of health, ayurvedic and nutritious benefits compared to white rice varieties. Furthermore, heirloom rice varieties in Sri Lanka have distinctive characteristics that ensure their survival from harsh environmental conditions such as heavy rains, changes in the climate and droughts.

    Ready to Eat Traditional Food

    From coconut relish to finger-licking fish curry, Sri Lanka is home to an abundance of scrumptious and healthy traditional food that is ready to be eaten. Cereal and cereal flour-based meal items are the most popular. Milk rice, locally known as Kiribath, which is prepared using rice and coconut milk is a traditional meal that is often served for breakfast and eaten on auspicious occasions. Flatbread, locally known as coconut roti, is a widely enjoyed traditional food that is easy to make. It is consumed for breakfast, lunch, dinner and even as a snack throughout the day.
    It is commonly served with a savory side dish (fish, meat etc), katta sambola (an onion and chili sambal), coconut sambal (pol sambola), lunu sambola (onion sambal) or seeni sambola (caramelized onion relish). There's also Diyabath, string hoppers (Indiáppa), Hoppers (Appa), and steamed rice rake (Pittu). Whole grain pulses and legumes such as the Mung bean, Black gram, Cowpea and Black-eyes peas are also a part of the traditional diet. They are typically enjoyed as a simple meal by boiling and garnishing with salt, coconut pieces, red chillies, and/or onion.

    Processed Fruits and Vegetables

    Sri Lanka's tropical environmental conditions have created the perfect conditions to deliver perfectly fresh, succulent fruits and vegetables in the peak of condition. Therefore, Sri Lanka is a specialist in cultivating the highest quality of processed fruits and vegetables at present. A wide range of specialised machinery is utilised to produce freshly prepared vegetables to the exact requirement. The processing of fruit and vegetables mostly involved freezing, drying, canning or preserving produce to extend shelf life. Types of packaging entail bottles, pouches, cartons, cans and bottles. The most commonly processed fruits include mangos, papayas, pineapple, melons, guavas, mangosteen and rambutan.

    Vegetables are processed by freezing that requires no preservatives and food additives. The most commonly processed vegetable varieties include young jack, okra, drum sticks and manioc. Sri Lanka produces more than 900,000 metric tons of fruit and vegetables annually and exports both fresh and processed varieties. The Middle East, Maldives, Europe, India, UK, Kuwait, India, Germany and Pakistan are the top countries that import processed fruits and vegetables from Sri Lanka.

    Beverages

    The Sri Lankan food and drink sector manufactures and supplies both alcoholic beverages and non-alcoholic beverages year-round. Without a doubt, it has been able to distinguish itself at the international level and obtain significant recognition. Beverages generally include various tea varieties, fruit juices, alcoholic beverages, king coconut bottled soft drinks, and coffee.

    Juices

    Sri Lanka is home to a spectacular variety of superb tropical fruits that is reflected in the variety of juices available. As they are year-round fruits, fresh papaya, pineapple, and lime juice are always excellent. Soursop and wood apple are two more unusual alternatives worth trying. One of the most popular and widespread natural drinks is King Coconut (the golden Thambili) - always pure, straight out of the nut, it is extremely refreshing. Herbal drinks are quite popular among the locals too.

    Tea

    As one of the world’s biggest exporters of high-quality tea for over a century, Sri Lanka is home to the finest in the world and Sri Lankan tea is referred to as ‘the best tea in the world’. From the golden brew to the splendid aroma and vibrant flavours, Sri Lankan tea varieties cater to every taste and style. Furthermore, local tea manufacturers produce and supply a variety of tea such as black tea, orthodox tea, and flavoured tea to the local and global marketplace. However, the highest quality varieties are generally exported.

    Alcohol Beverages

    Alcoholic beverages are widely enjoyed by Sri Lankans - especially males. Beer is the most sought-after alcoholic beverage due to its popularity and strong taste. Moreover, wine has had its fair share of popularity throughout the years. There are several traditional alcoholic drinks. Toddy is one of the most traditional alcoholic drinks in Sri Lanka. It is made by fermenting the sap of a coconut palm. Thus, it has a white appearance with a sweet, characteristic flavour. Another popular traditional alcoholic beverage is Arak which is a distillation of the juice of a palm tree or from coconut toddy. It is often enjoyed with soda, coca-cola, cold water or ice cubes.

    Coffee

    Coffee production and consumption in Sri Lanka goes back to the nineteenth century when coffee plantations were formed in Ceylon under British rule. Since then, coffee production has played a major role in forming the national economy until the last quarter of the nineteenth century. At present, coffee is no longer a main contributor to the economy although it remains a source of revenue. Presently, Sri Lanka is catering to an international clientele via the high-quality varieties of coffee grown in Sri Lanka. Hot coffee is typically served in Sri Lanka for breakfast, late at night, or on cold rainy days. The most common varieties include Arabica coffee, Robusta coffee, and Liberica coffee.

Food, Feed & Beverages

Sri Lankan food & beverage sector covers a wide range of products including processed vegetables, fruits, concentrates and juices, semi-cooked food, confectionery, bakery products, ready-to-serve food and beverages, animal feed and preparations of cereals

Product Varieties & Suppliers

  • Food, Feed & Beverages

    Info

    Directory

    eMARKETPLACE

  • Dehydrated Foods

    Directory

    eMARKETPLACE

  • Processed Vegetables, Fruits & Juices

    Directory

    eMARKETPLACE

  • Processed Food

    Directory

    eMARKETPLACE

  • Rice, Cereals, Oil Seed and its Products

    Directory

    eMARKETPLACE

  • Coffee

    Directory

    eMARKETPLACE

  • Beverages

    Directory

    eMARKETPLACE

  • Animal Feed

    Directory

    eMARKETPLACE

  • Meats

    Directory

    eMARKETPLACE